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Life after Castro?

Generation Change in Cuba

Life after Castro: Generation Change in Cuba 

Since April 2018, for the first time in 60 years, Cuba’s president is not called Castro. What does this generational change mean for Cuba? How deep do they go? What does the future hold for this endlessly alluring country? Join us to find out.

Since April 2018, for the first time in 60 years, Cuba’s president is not called Castro. What does this generational change mean for Cuba? What does the future hold for this endlessly alluring country? Join us to find out.

Departure Dates

30 Jan – 8 Feb 2019 (Confirmed Departure)
6 – 16 March 2019

Length

10 days/ 9 nights

Tour Route

Havana – Santa Clara – Trinidad – Sancti Spíritus – Havana

Language

German

Included

All in-country costs*

Life after Castro? 

Generation Change in Cuba

More than 50 years after his death, the iconic image of Che Guevara continues to be recognised and usurped by a new generation around the world. Almost 60 years since the Batista regime was overthrown, the US continues an economic embargo. The Cuban missile crisis continues to be war-gamed to learn lessons from the past and avoid nuclear catastrophe. Rum. 1950s cars. Cigars. Music. To put it mildly, Cuba, a small country of just 11 million people, has had a super-sized impact on the global public imagination.   

While some economic reforms have occurred in the last decade, these have been gradual rather than radical. Similarly, in the political sphere, while the country is certainly more open than it was 20 years ago, the system remains fundamentally unchanged. The closer economic and political ties between Cuba and the US promoted by the Obama administration have also been put on hold or rolled back under Trump. Although no one can be entirely sure as to the shape of future economic and political developments, one change is certain: generational change. 

With the passing of the presidency out of the Castro family in April 2018 to Miguel Diaz-Canel, for the first time the country is no longer headed by a Barbudos (bearded revolutionary). While a new constitution is being developed, it remains unclear how great the changes will be. Will things stay essentially the same or is significant change coming? What are the hopes and aspirations of the next generation who did not participate in the revolution? What will it mean for Cuba’s future as they gradually take over? What are the domestic and international forces at play which will help shape the future?

Join us to on this tour, almost a year since the new President was appointed, to find out. Our focus will be on Central Cuba, as this is the heart of the country and where the diversity is strongest. We will go beyond the stereotypes and usual tourist destinations, visiting urban and rural areas, meeting with a wide-range of government officials, academics, business people, artists, commentators and Cubans from different walks of life. While we will focus on understanding the current social, economic and political situation, no tour to Cuba would be complete with amply opportunities to enjoy Cuba’s rich culture, music and entertainment!

Daily Itinerary


Day 1

We will meet for dinner at a restaurant in Havana old-town, where we will look forward to the week ahead and discuss the key issues that we will explore, followed by a walk along the El Malecon (Havana’s iconic seafront).

Overnight in Havana.

Day 2

We will spend the morning at the Council of State and the University of Havana, where we will examine the changes of government announced in April and look at what this means for the country.

After lunch, we will spend the afternoon exploring the old-town accompanied by a local historian. We will then go to less well-known parts of Havana – way beyond the usual tourist areas – to look at how the city has developed, the housing situation and the population distribution.

After dinner together, we will have the opportunity to go to hear some great Cuban live music.

Overnight in Havana.

Day 3

We have an early morning start as we head towards Varadero. On the way we will stop off at the 19th century Ernest Hemingway house, where he lived on and off for more than 20 years and wrote some of his most famous novels, including For Whom The Bell Tolls and The Old Man and the Sea. The town of Valadero, along with its sandy white beaches, acts as a fascinating microcosm of many of the changes within Cuba. Once the playground for the rich, Varadero is now a mass tourism destination (attracting more than 1 million visitors a year), with significant foreign investment. After arrival in Varadero, we will have a tour of the peninsula to explore how it has evolved and how this reflects the broader social and economic changes within the country.

The afternoon is free for you to enjoy the beach.

In the evening we will have dinner with a representative from the Ministry of Tourism and researchers from the University of Matanzas, where we will explore the many different types of tourism in the area, how tourism has affected Cuba and the challenges, opportunities, changing nature and perspectives for the future before returning to Havana.

Overnight in Havana.

Day 4

Today we move on to Santa Clara, Cuba’s fifth largest city located in the Centre of the country. Also known as Che Guevara’s town, it was the site of the last battle of the Cuban revolution in late 1958. We will spend the morning exploring Che Guevara’s legacy and impact on modern day Cuba in the company of academics from the local university.

In the afternoon we will visit the town of San Juan de los Remedios, which is home to the most popular annual film festival in Cuba. Cinema has played an important part in Cuban society, with the revolution ushering in the “Golden Era”, where key socio-political issues were explored through film. We will meet with organisers of the film festival who will discuss how cinema has changed over the years and the major themes which trace the country’s evolution.

Over a fish speciality dinner in the coastal town of Caibairen near Remedios, we will look at how tourism is developing within the area and how successful (or not) it is in avoiding the many issues associated with mass tourism around Varadeo. After dinner we will return to Santa Clara where, for those who are interested, there are many opportunities to sample the city’s diverse and alternative nightlife.   

Overnight in Santa Clara.

Day 5

Today we move on to Trinidad, a wonderfully preserved Spanish town in the province of Sancti Spiritus in central Cuba and UNESCO world heritage site. On the way we will stop of at Cienfuegos, a town of French Origin with a UNESCO world heritage site centre, where we will meet with civil society groups to talk about the development of the town and the social issues it faces. We will arrive in Trinidad in the late afternoon. After checking into the hotel and leaving some time for people to explore the cobbled streets of Cuba’s biggest “open air museum” at their leisure, we will meet for dinner before sampling some of the town’s great night life, culture and Canchanchara.

Overnight in Trinidad.

Day 6

In the company of a local historian, we will spend the morning looking at the old town (probably the best preserved colonial town in the whole of the Caribbean) and exploring the legacy of Cuba’s colonial past. As well as being of historical interest, Trinidad is also one of the most mixed towns in Cuba, with a wide-range of people of different decent, social classes and religious affiliations. As such, it is one of the best places in the whole country to really understand Cuba’s historical and current social stratification of Cuba.

The afternoon will be spent with members of these different groups to understand their perspectives on the current situation and hopes for the future.

The evening is free for people to enjoy Trinidad at their leisure.

Overnight in Trinidad.

Day 7

Today we move on to Sancti Spiritus. After checking into the hotel and a visit to the lovely old town, we will meet with representatives of the local authorities to explore the perspectives on the changes in government from a local level. The health and education systems have been the areas where Cuba has made real strides in recent decades, with many seeing them as models.

We will spend the afternoon looking at these through visits to schools and health centres and discussions with professionals to understand how these function and to explore what, if any, changes are expected.

The evening is free for people to enjoy Sancti Spiritus at their leisure.

Overnight in Sancti Spiritus.

Day 8

We will spend the morning at Sancti Spiritus University where we will have the chance to meet with academics and researchers from a variety of disciplines to explore a whole range of diverse political, economic and social issues facing Cuba, including the relationship with the United States.

We will have lunch with students from the university, where we will discuss the issue of generation change and their hopes and aspirations for the future of the country. Agriculture was one of the first areas where economic reforms took place, and we will spend the afternoon outside of the town visiting private farmers (including tobacco farmers) and cooperatives in order to explore the current economic model and changes which are occurring.

We will have dinner hosted by a cooperative where we will have the opportunity to sample locally produced products and hospitality.

Overnight in Sancti Spiritus.

Day 9

After breakfast we will start our 300 KM road trip back to Havana, where we will arrive in the later afternoon or early evening. We will, of course, make a number of stops along the way, including the Canario Museum in Cabaiguan and the iconic Bay of Pigs, the location of the attempted CIA-backed invasion of 1961.

We will have a late dinner in one of the small private restaurants in the old-town.

Overnight in Havana.

Day 10

We spend our final morning together visiting some of Havana’s art galleries. We save this for the end of the tour, as this will provide us with the opportunity to see how the themes we have experienced on our journey have been reflected (or ignored) and interpreted by Cuba’s artists.

We will have a final long lunch together, where we will reflect on our journey together, share our impressions and say our goodbyes.

All of our tours are dynamic and seek to take advantage of current political events. Thus, final itineraries can be subject to modification. Also, some people we plan to meet might no longer be available or still be in their positions. This is simply the nature of the types of tours we offer and the reality of some of the countries we visit. In all cases, we will seek replacement meetings of a similiar level. 

If you think there are relevant topics missing from the itinerary which you are interested in, please do suggest them and we might be able to include them, as our tour experts have wide-ranging and diverse networks. 

Tour Expert

Foto Prof. Dr. Felipe Hernandez Penton

We are delighted to have Professor Dr. Felipe Hernández Pentón as our guide on this tour. Felipe has been a Professor of economics at the University of Sancti Spiritus, since 2001. Prior to that he spent 15 years as a professor at the University of Santa Clara. Read more…

Travel Details

Price:

  €3,850 per person based on sharing double/ twin room

 Single person supplement €450

*Includes:

 All  meetings, experts, specialised tours, entry fees, translation, venues, cultural events/ entertainment (see itinerary)

  Upper middle class and middle class hotels

  Private busses and rented taxis

  All Meals except on free evenings (see itinerary), non-alcoholic drinks

Please note:

Tour language is German

Price does not include flights to and from destination

Valid passport and visa (“tourist card”) required for EU citizens (see information for travel/health requirements German Foreign Office)

Tour is partially suitable for people with disabilities (please contact us)

If the minimum number of tour participants (6 people) is not reached, New Perspectives Travel reserves the right to cancel the tour up to 20 days before departure (see Terms and Conditions).

Please inform us of any special requirements you might have

Further Information

Please visit our About Us and Frequently Asked Questions for further information on our tours or simply contact us!

More than 50 years after his death, the iconic image of Che Guevara continues to be recognised and usurped by a new generation around the world. Almost 60 years since the Batista regime was overthrown, the US continues an economic embargo. The Cuban missile crisis continues to be war-gamed to learn lessons from the past and avoid nuclear catastrophe. Rum. 1950s cars. Cigars. Music. To put it mildly, Cuba, a small country of just 11 million people, has had a super-sized impact on the global public imagination.   

While some economic reforms have occurred in the last decade, these have been gradual rather than radical. Similarly, in the political sphere, while the country is certainly more open than it was 20 years ago, the system remains fundamentally unchanged. The closer economic and political ties between Cuba and the US promoted by the Obama administration have also been put on hold or rolled back under Trump. Although no one can be entirely sure as to the shape of future economic and political developments, one change is certain: generational change. 

With the passing of the presidency out of the Castro family in April 2018 to Miguel Diaz-Canel, for the first time the country is no longer headed by a Barbudos (bearded revolutionary). While a new constitution is being developed, it remains unclear how great the changes will be. Will things stay essentially the same or is significant change coming? What are the hopes and aspirations of the next generation who did not participate in the revolution? What will it mean for Cuba’s future as they gradually take over? What are the domestic and international forces at play which will help shape the future?

Join us to on this tour, almost a year since the new President was appointed, to find out. Our focus will be on Central Cuba, as this is the heart of the country and where the diversity is strongest. We will go beyond the stereotypes and usual tourist destinations, visiting urban and rural areas, meeting with a wide-range of government officials, academics, business people, artists, commentators and Cubans from different walks of life. While we will focus on understanding the current social, economic and political situation, no tour to Cuba would be complete with amply opportunities to enjoy Cuba’s rich culture, music and entertainment!

Daily Itinerary


Day 1

We will meet for dinner at a restaurant in Havana old-town, where we will look forward to the week ahead and discuss the key issues that we will explore, followed by a walk along the El Malecon (Havana’s iconic seafront).

Overnight in Havana.

Day 2

We will spend the morning at the Council of State and the University of Havana, where we will examine the changes of government announced in April and look at what this means for the country.

After lunch, we will spend the afternoon exploring the old-town accompanied by a local historian. We will then go to less well-known parts of Havana – way beyond the usual tourist areas – to look at how the city has developed, the housing situation and the population distribution.

After dinner together, we will have the opportunity to go to hear some great Cuban live music.

Overnight in Havana.

Day 3

We have an early morning start as we head towards Varadero. On the way we will stop off at the 19th century Ernest Hemingway house, where he lived on and off for more than 20 years and wrote some of his most famous novels, including For Whom The Bell Tolls and The Old Man and the Sea. The town of Valadero, along with its sandy white beaches, acts as a fascinating microcosm of many of the changes within Cuba. Once the playground for the rich, Varadero is now a mass tourism destination (attracting more than 1 million visitors a year), with significant foreign investment. After arrival in Varadero, we will have a tour of the peninsula to explore how it has evolved and how this reflects the broader social and economic changes within the country.

The afternoon is free for you to enjoy the beach.

In the evening we will have dinner with a representative from the Ministry of Tourism and researchers from the University of Matanzas, where we will explore the many different types of tourism in the area, how tourism has affected Cuba and the challenges, opportunities, changing nature and perspectives for the future before returning to Havana.

Overnight in Havana.

Day 4

Today we move on to Santa Clara, Cuba’s fifth largest city located in the Centre of the country. Also known as Che Guevara’s town, it was the site of the last battle of the Cuban revolution in late 1958. We will spend the morning exploring Che Guevara’s legacy and impact on modern day Cuba in the company of academics from the local university.

In the afternoon we will visit the town of San Juan de los Remedios, which is home to the most popular annual film festival in Cuba. Cinema has played an important part in Cuban society, with the revolution ushering in the “Golden Era”, where key socio-political issues were explored through film. We will meet with organisers of the film festival who will discuss how cinema has changed over the years and the major themes which trace the country’s evolution.

Over a fish speciality dinner in the coastal town of Caibairen near Remedios, we will look at how tourism is developing within the area and how successful (or not) it is in avoiding the many issues associated with mass tourism around Varadeo. After dinner we will return to Santa Clara where, for those who are interested, there are many opportunities to sample the city’s diverse and alternative nightlife.   

Overnight in Santa Clara.

Day 5

Today we move on to Trinidad, a wonderfully preserved Spanish town in the province of Sancti Spiritus in central Cuba and UNESCO world heritage site. On the way we will stop of at Cienfuegos, a town of French Origin with a UNESCO world heritage site centre, where we will meet with civil society groups to talk about the development of the town and the social issues it faces. We will arrive in Trinidad in the late afternoon. After checking into the hotel and leaving some time for people to explore the cobbled streets of Cuba’s biggest “open air museum” at their leisure, we will meet for dinner before sampling some of the town’s great night life, culture and Canchanchara.

Overnight in Trinidad.

Day 6

In the company of a local historian, we will spend the morning looking at the old town (probably the best preserved colonial town in the whole of the Caribbean) and exploring the legacy of Cuba’s colonial past. As well as being of historical interest, Trinidad is also one of the most mixed towns in Cuba, with a wide-range of people of different decent, social classes and religious affiliations. As such, it is one of the best places in the whole country to really understand Cuba’s historical and current social stratification of Cuba.

The afternoon will be spent with members of these different groups to understand their perspectives on the current situation and hopes for the future.

The evening is free for people to enjoy Trinidad at their leisure.

Overnight in Trinidad.

Day 7

Today we move on to Sancti Spiritus. After checking into the hotel and a visit to the lovely old town, we will meet with representatives of the local authorities to explore the perspectives on the changes in government from a local level. The health and education systems have been the areas where Cuba has made real strides in recent decades, with many seeing them as models.

We will spend the afternoon looking at these through visits to schools and health centres and discussions with professionals to understand how these function and to explore what, if any, changes are expected.

The evening is free for people to enjoy Sancti Spiritus at their leisure.

Overnight in Sancti Spiritus.

Day 8

We will spend the morning at Sancti Spiritus University where we will have the chance to meet with academics and researchers from a variety of disciplines to explore a whole range of diverse political, economic and social issues facing Cuba, including the relationship with the United States.

We will have lunch with students from the university, where we will discuss the issue of generation change and their hopes and aspirations for the future of the country. Agriculture was one of the first areas where economic reforms took place, and we will spend the afternoon outside of the town visiting private farmers (including tobacco farmers) and cooperatives in order to explore the current economic model and changes which are occurring.

We will have dinner hosted by a cooperative where we will have the opportunity to sample locally produced products and hospitality.

Overnight in Sancti Spiritus.

Day 9

After breakfast we will start our 300 KM road trip back to Havana, where we will arrive in the later afternoon or early evening. We will, of course, make a number of stops along the way, including the Canario Museum in Cabaiguan and the iconic Bay of Pigs, the location of the attempted CIA-backed invasion of 1961.

We will have a late dinner in one of the small private restaurants in the old-town.

Overnight in Havana.

Day 10

We spend our final morning together visiting some of Havana’s art galleries. We save this for the end of the tour, as this will provide us with the opportunity to see how the themes we have experienced on our journey have been reflected (or ignored) and interpreted by Cuba’s artists.

We will have a final long lunch together, where we will reflect on our journey together, share our impressions and say our goodbyes.

All of our tours are dynamic and seek to take advantage of current political events. Thus, final itineraries can be subject to modification. Also, some people we plan to meet might no longer be available or still be in their positions. This is simply the nature of the types of tours we offer and the reality of some of the countries we visit. In all cases, we will seek replacement meetings of a similiar level. 

If you think there are relevant topics missing from the itinerary which you are interested in, please do suggest them and we might be able to include them, as our tour experts have wide-ranging and diverse networks. 

Tour Expert

Foto Prof. Dr. Felipe Hernandez Penton

We are delighted to have Professor Dr. Felipe Hernández Pentón as our guide on this tour. Felipe has been a Professor of economics at the University of Sancti Spiritus, since 2001. Prior to that he spent 15 years as a professor at the University of Santa Clara. Read more…

Travel Details

Departure Dates:

30 Jan – 8 Feb 2019 (Confirmed Departure), 6 – 16 March 2019

Length:

10 days/ 9 nights

Tour Route:

Havana – Santa Clara – Trinidad – Sancti Spíritus – Havana

Language:

German

Price:

  €3,850 per person based on sharing double/ twin room  Single person supplement €450

Includes:

 All  meetings, experts, specialised tours, entry fees, translation, venues, cultural events/ entertainment (see itinerary)   Upper middle class and middle class hotels   Private busses and rented taxis   All Meals except on free evenings (see itinerary), non-alcoholic drinks

Please note:

Tour language is German Price does not include flights to and from destination Valid passport and visa (“tourist card”) required for EU citizens (see information for travel/health requirements German Foreign Office) Tour is partially suitable for people with disabilities (please contact us) If the minimum number of tour participants (6 people) is not reached, New Perspectives Travel reserves the right to cancel the tour up to 20 days before departure (see Terms and Conditions). Please inform us of any special requirements you might have

Further Information

Please visit our About Us and Frequently Asked Questions for further information on our tours or simply contact us!